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Microseismic

 Monitoring


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Table of Contents    PDF

  1. Introduction
  2. Applications
  3. Sites
  4. Software
  5. Recent Awards
  6. Recent Publications
  7. Staff Contacts

Introduction

The use of microseismic monitoring for the investigation of rock bursts and mine instability is well established in many countries. CSIRO's work has pioneered the use of microseismic monitoring for the study of the caving associated with the underground mining of coal using the longwall method. In longwall mining, the roof rocks need to fail and fall into the mined out area, so as to avoid an excessive build up of stress at the coal face and in the pillars of coal to the sides of the mining panel. The amount of stress generated is a function of the physical dimensions of the longwall panel, the strength of the geological strata, the regional stress , and the specifications of the longwall equipment. Microseismic monitoring has a role to play because the failure of the rock strata causes microseismic emissions. Monitoring of these emissions allows determination of the fracture location and the mining induced stress release in 4D (x, y, z, t), and the mechanism of the source failure, .

CSIRO has developed and built its own microseismic monitoring system. The microseismic monitoring system is designed to operate continuously with minimal intervention, record data from numerous triaxial geophones and can also be remotely controlled from our office in Brisbane.

Microseismic monitoring has been conducted at ten longwall coal mines and two highwall coal mines throughout Queensland and New South Wales. The results from these projects have demonstrated that microseismic monitoring can accurately and dynamically determine the extent of fracturing in the roof and floor strata of a coal seam, the intensity of rock failures and failure mechanisms and therefore, has great potential for operational use in detecting mining hazards. Mining panel layouts have been altered on the basis of microseismic layouts to ensure that mines are safer and more productive.


Applications

Microseismic monitoring enables the accurate determination of mining induced stress release in 4D (x, y, z, t), providing a mechanism to help mine operators address ground control issues including


Sites

Coal Mine Location Research Area Year of Experiment
Gordonstone Colliery Queensland, Australia Longwall Caving 1994
Appin Colliery NSW, Australia Longwall Geomechanics 1996
North Goonyella Colliery Queensland, Australia Longwall Geomechanics 1997
Oaky Creek Colliery Queensland, Australia Highwall Stability 1996
Southern Colliery Queensland, Australia Longwall Geomechanics 1998
South Blackwater Queensland, Australia Longwall Geomechanics 1998
Xinglongzhuang Shandong, China Longwall Geomechanics 1999
South Blackwater Queensland, Australia Longwall Geomechanics 1999
South Bulli Colliery NSW, Australia Longwall Geomechanics 1999
Moura Mine Queensland, Australia Highwall Stability 1999
Southern Colliery Queensland, Australia Longwall Geomechanics 1999
Dartbrook Colliery NSW, Australia Longwall Gas, Geomechanics 1999

Software

Siroseis is a CSIRO developed seismic data processing package designed specifically for mine scale microseismic monitoring. This is in response for a need to reduce the labour intensity required for seismic data processing. Siroseis features include:

Determination of fracture location and origin time.

Easy to use MS-Windows based program.

Determination of event magnitude.

Energy spectrum analysis.

Determination of fracture mechanisms (shear or tensile failures).

Several signal processing and filtering tools.

Automatic arrival time picking and event location.

This information is extremely valuable for strata control and mine hazard management. Siroseis is currently under further development.

 

Recent Awards


Recent Publications

 


Staff Contacts


This page was created and is maintained by Justin Ross.